How can technology enable medical information exchange for improved senior care?


While we all understand that data on seniors' mental state and physical activity can add up to the overall quality of healthcare, we're still adjusting to modern health technology. Yet, the faster we can integrate remote solutions into our senior relatives' lives, the higher the quality of help they will receive.

The remote monitoring solutions are designed to provide actionable data to caregivers, helping them prevent costly emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and more. There is a variety of digital services that help seniors stay healthy, including telephonic nurse advice, medication adherence, fall detection and prevention, safety alerts and activity tracking through wearables.

If you're currently discovering what tool options are out there, I'd recommend checking out the following ones:

Remote Nursing Advice - this can be a useful solution for seniors who want to stay connected to their doctor when they are away from home or travelling.

Fall Detection - alert systems help detect the fall and notify family members, caregivers or emergency services so they can take appropriate action quickly before serious injury occurs.

Medication Adherence - certain apps help seniors adhere to their medications by providing reminders via text message or phone call at scheduled times each day so they don't forget what time they need to take their medication or if they have already taken it that day.

Why should we develop a continuum of care for seniors?

From monitoring for early signs of disease, through treatment and recovery, to managing long-term consequences, the continuum reduces the need for costly emergency department visits, inpatient hospitalizations and nursing home stays. As a result, this preventive approach can help seniors remain independent for a longer period of time.

So what key elements of the continuum of care can benefit older adults?:

1. Assessments. They are used to identify potential issues that could lead to a decline in health or function. The assessments may include medical, psychological and social factors such as diet, exercise, sleep and medication compliance.

2. Monitoring. Monitoring for early signs of disease can help identify issues before they become serious problems that require an emergency department visit or hospitalization.

3. Treatment and Recovery. Treatment may include medications and physical therapy, while recovery might include implementing strategies to prevent future episodes.

4. And last but not least, management of long-term consequences/chronic conditions.

Do you think such a preventive approach could prolong seniors’ independent living?

Let me know your thoughts in the comments.